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  1. Default Interesting #1MK3* Opinions Wanted...

    As stated I have a 1918 dated #1MK3*. I was given this rifle some 25 years ago in exchange for some work I had done for someone. The rifle has the original serial crossed out and another one stamped below that. On the receiver is M broad arrow M with a number 2 above the broad arrow symbol. The receiver, bolt sight leaf and nosecap all match. The bolt cocking piece is marked MA 42 and the magazine which is unnumbered has a Lithgow proof. Was this rifle a rebuilt WW1 pressed into service for WW2 by the Aussies? Overall shape is VG with a nice bore and blue finish at about 90 percent. What is something like this worth? TIA......

  2. Default

    Anyone??

  3. #3

    Default

    You asked a lot of questions without showing us anything. Only a very vague description. You know what you're looking at. We don't. Therefore none of us can say for certain.
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  4. #4
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    Sounds like a 42 rebuild but pics are needed. I have a 41 Lithgow rebuilt in 42. Rifles during that time were pressed hard and there were not enough. Anything that could be brought back to life was in the early years of WW2. Without pics it's a pig in a poke $150 to $350.00. Lithgow prices have been down but early works with lots of rebuild stamps still bring decent coin. Post some good pictures and one of us will narrow it down for you.

  5. #5
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    Probably not "pressed into service". The Aussies never switched to No. 4 Rifles and only ever used No. 1's. If it's Brit, it was probably issued to an Australian unit during W.W. I. Aussies got 'em in Africa. Should still have the manufacturer and date on the butt socket. It have any 'FTR' stamps on it?
    "...early years of WW2..." 1942 was not the early years of W.W. II. W.W. II started in 1939.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunray View Post
    Probably not "pressed into service". The Aussies never switched to No. 4 Rifles and only ever used No. 1's. If it's Brit, it was probably issued to an Australian unit during W.W. I. Aussies got 'em in Africa. Should still have the manufacturer and date on the butt socket. It have any 'FTR' stamps on it?
    "...early years of WW2..." 1942 was not the early years of W.W. II. W.W. II started in 1939.
    By early I'm talking about the period the aussies and everyone else were getting their asses kicked, 1942 was still very much in doubt and Australia was still under the threat of invasion. Every rifle they had and or could get put back in to service was. If it's a WW1 rifle rearsenaled in 1942 pressed back into service, put back into service, rebuilt for the newest xxxx show, all apply. They didn't care if it was a Lithgow only that it was a Lee Enfield. Without pictures we can speculate till the kangaroos come home.

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